Paula Recommends ...Pan Roasted Tomato & Chickpea Salad

This savory and slightly sweet salad fits the bill. The peppery arugula and fresh basil served with warm citrus dressing and pan roasted tomatoes provide a hint of summer and plenty of comfort, along with protein, vitamin C, lycopene, fiber and potassium. - Paula Meyer, Mission Training Center Nutritionist 

Ingredients
1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
3 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1⁄4 cup orange juice
1 Tablespoon red wine vinegar
1⁄2 teaspoon Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
6 cups baby arugula
2 cups basil leaves
One 15 oz can no salt added chickpeas, drained

Directions
1. In a large non-stick pan, sauté the tomatoes, cut side down, in 1 Tablespoon of the oil until well browned, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the pan and reserve.

2. Add the remaining oil and sauté the garlic for 30 seconds. Stir in the orange juice and simmer to reduce by half, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the vinegar, salt and plenty of black pepper.

3. Toss the arugula and basil leaves with the dressing and top with the tomatoes and chickpeas.

Note: Makes 4 (2 cup) servings

Nutritional info: Per serving: 230 calories, 12g total fat (1.5g saturated fat), 25g carbohydrate, 7g protein, 5g dietary fiber, 270 mg sodium.


Paula Recommends ...Celery, Sunchoke, Green Apple Salad with Walnuts & Mustard Vinaigrette

Crispy and refreshing, this delicious salad is loaded with complex tastes and flavors that will delight your family or guests. The ingredients will hold up well if made ahead and dressed just before serving. - Paula Meyer, Mission Training Center Nutritionist 

Ingredients
1⁄2 cup walnuts, roughly chopped
4 large celery stalks, peeled and thinly sliced, and 1⁄4 cup leaves chopped
1 head fennel, trimmed and thinly sliced lengthwise, fronds reserved
1 large sunchoke (5 oz) peeled and thinly sliced (1 cup)
1 large Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and thinly
sliced
3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon Dijon style mustard
1 garlic clove, grated through a fine grater or minced
2 tablespoons honey
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Directions
1. Toast walnuts in a skillet over medium heat until fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes. (Be careful not to burn.)
2. Place sliced celery, fennel, sunchoke and apple in a bowl of cold water. Stir in 1 tablespoon lemon juice and refrigerate.
3. In a small bowl, combine remaining lemon juice, mustard, garlic, honey and salt. Whisk in oil and season with pepper.
4. Drain chilled celery, fennel and sunchokes and dry in a salad spinner or blot with a paper towel.
5. Combine celery, fennel, sunchoke, celery leaves, walnuts and apples.
6. Toss with dressing before serving.
7. Garnish with fennel fronds.

Nutrition information: Serves 6. Per serving: 170 calories, 15g total fat (1.8 g saturated fat) 8g carbohydrate, 2g protein, 2.5g dietary fiber.


Kickboxing Your Way to Health & Fitness

Looking to improve your balance, power, agility and flexibility, all while increasing your fitness? Consider kickboxing.

It may sound intimidating at first but it is accessible to people at every level – from beginner to expert. Best, it offers health benefits to all, no matter how experienced or inexperienced you may be.

Kickboxing focuses on power over strength. As reported by ​Time​ in “How Kickboxing Can Change Your Body and Your Life,” power is more about force and speed and not as much about how much weight someone can lift. With its short intensive periods of activity, it burns more than eight calories a minute. It also improves coordination, even in extreme cases. Among people with multiple sclerosis, for example, kickboxing strengthens neuromuscular control which helps with balance, mobility and dual-tasking activities.

It is an incredible workout. It also helps people who do it avoid injuries caused by the dynamic motion required in sports such as pickup basketball or skiing. For more information on kickboxing, click here.

 


Scott Doescher

Mastering Survivorship.
Swimmer, Competitor, CPA, Dad

Three months after returning to the pool and just four months into surviving prostate cancer, the then 47-year-old Scott Doescher took it to a whole new level ...or rather back to a level familiar to him decades earlier: He returned to competitive swimming, landing a spot at the national level masters swim championship.

In an article by Victoria Freile that ran in the Democrat & Chronicle, Doescher said that lifting weights and tackling cardio on an elliptical machine helped his body bounce back after surgery so he decided to return to the pool as part of his recovery efforts.

For the complete article and more on Scott Doescher, click here.


In the Swim

From WebMD.com | By Kara Mayer Robinson

Excerpt: "If you are looking for a great aerobic and total body-strengthening workout, then look no further. Swimming can provide all that and more.

"Also, if you don't love working up a sweat but do love the benefits of a cardio workout, swimming may be your ideal match. The water keeps you cool, even as your heart gets a great workout.  You'll probably be able to keep yourself going for a longer time than if you were running. That's because it's fun and gentle on your joints and muscles. The water can also feel relaxing.

"Note: If you have been a couch potato, or you have heart disease or other medical problems, check with your doctor first to see what kind of swimming program is right for you."

For the complete article including more on the areas swimming targets and additional benefits, click here.


Paula recommends ...Smoothie with Pineapple, Arugula, Greens and Cashews

This smoothie was a hands-down favorite among members at the Mission Training Center, our incubator for best practices in programs for survivors. It is delicious, nutritious, and oh-so-quick-and-easy to prepare. The pineapple's sweetness can stand alone as a fruit to combine with the pungent greens. The cashews add protein, healthy fat and a creamy-ness that makes this seem decadent. A slice of ginger also adds valuable nutrients and really pumps up the flavor. With orange juice as a base, this is dairy-free and gluten-free. It’s best to use the pungent, feathery wild arugula. We used a baby greens mix that included a herb mix. - Paula Meyer, Mission Training Center Nutritionist 

Ingredients
1⁄4 pineapple, peeled, cored and cut into chunks (about 6 ounces peeled and cored pineapple)
3⁄4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (or the juice that accumulates after cutting up the pineapple mixed with enough orange juice to equal 3⁄4 cup)
2 Tablespoons raw cashews (about 3⁄4 cup)
1⁄2 teaspoon chia seeds
1⁄4 cup tightly packed arugula (about 1⁄4 ounce)
3⁄4 cup tightly packed baby mixed greens (about 1 1⁄2 ounces)
1 quarter size slice ginger, peeled
2 or 3 ice cubes

Directions
1. Place all of the ingredients in a blender and blend for 1 minute, or until smooth.

Note: Makes one generous serving or 2 medium sized servings (cut the numbers below in half if serving 2).

Nutritional info: 328 calories; 12 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 53 grams carbohydrates; 7 grams dietary fiber; 16 milligrams sodium, 8 grams protein. 


Why Cross Training Matters

From WebMD.com | By Stephanie Watson

Excerpt: "Cross-training is ideal for anyone, whether you're a beginner who wants to get in shape or an experienced exerciser looking to take your fitness to the next level. It's the backbone of any well-developed exercise program. The wide variety of activities means you can choose what works for you.

One of the most common mistakes people make with exercise is repeating the same routine week after week. To continue to improve your fitness level and reap all the benefits of regular exercise, you need to keep your body guessing. Cross training does this for you. When you do the same activity over and over, you also set yourself up for overuse injuries. Cross training helps solve this problem, too.

Check with your doctor if you're new to exercise. Once you get the OK, cross training should be where you start."

For the complete article including more information on target areas, intensity levels and types of workouts, click here.


Ryan Tucker

Road Warrior.

In 2005, at the age of three, Ryan was diagnosed with a large infiltrating brain stem tumor. A biopsy was performed which indicated that Ryan had a pilocytic astrocytoma. Ryan had an 11-hour surgery on 4/21/05 that removed approximately 95% of the tumor. After surgery, Ryan went through years of physical, occupational and speech therapy. He had to learn how to walk and talk all over again.

Ryan was treated with chemotherapy from December 2007 to May 2008 and again in February 2013. After a year of very harsh chemo treatments, Ryan's tumor was stable. The effects of the tumor, surgeries and treatments left Ryan with many challenges including left-sided weakness, right-sided ataxia and eye muscle deficits that impact his depth perception. He rarely complained about all this and merely longed to be like everyone else. One thing he dearly wanted to be able to do was ride a bike.

Ryan began coming to the Mission Training Center seven years ago. With help from his personal trainer, he learned how to ride a bike. He completed the 10-mile course in his first CT Challenge ride in 2016. In 2017 and 2018, Ryan completed the 25-mile course. Now 17 years old, Ryan is returning to the Mission Training Center to continue to counter the after effects of his battle.

The video below is Ryan's victory lap, shot four years ago when he finally achieved his goal of riding a bike. This is what triumph looks like. It's what happens when hope and hard work meet the resources needed to bring them together, resources like the Mission Adventure Project.


Andres Galarraga

Survivorship in Full Swing.
Tenacious. Ebullient. Comeback Player for the Ages.

This story is a bit of a rewind but it’s worth re-telling. It’s about retired Major League Baseball player Andres Galarraga, a first baseman and one of the game’s top hitters at the time. Winner of the 1993 National League batting title, his nickname was the Big Cat for his defensive agility as well. In 1994, playing for the Atlanta Braves, he hit an astounding 44 home runs and was named to the All-Star team for the fourth time. It also made him the first player ever to hit 40 home runs in back to back years for two different teams. He was 37 years old.

Immediately following that season, his life took a different turn when persistent back pain led to a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Given the location of his cancer, playing through treatment was out of the question. He missed the entire season. Galarragas returned the next year to a standing ovation on Opening Day. In an article that ran shortly after his return, the L.A. Times wrote, “During his six rounds of chemotherapy last summer, Galarraga ballooned to 280 pounds, and he suffered from nausea. When he was done with chemo, he had a month of radiation. At times he could scarcely recognize himself.”

The year he returned to the field, Galarraga played as if he’d never missed a beat, defying all expectations. He was named to his fifth career All-Star game that year and won the National League Comeback Player of the Year award.

In that same L.A. Times article, Galarraga said it was his mission to show other cancer sufferers that the disease can be beaten, that a seriously ill person can get stronger, and even better.

Boy did he ever.

For more on Galarraga, click here.